merchant of venice act 4, scene 1 pdf

I have spoke thus much PORTIA. SHYLOCK. She reads the contract between Antonio and Shylock and insists that it must be followed to the letter. Workbook Answers/ Solutions of The Merchant of Venice, Act 4 Scene 1: In this post, we will provide you complete details of the famous play “Merchant of Venice” Act 4 Scene 1 by Shakespeare.You can read the whole act from the images given below. GRATIANO. Down therefore, and beg mercy of the Duke. turn'd o'er many books together; he is furnished with my opinion Bring us the letters; call the messenger. The Duke • expected to face difficulty in this case – Shylock was adamant in wanting his bond and the Duke wanted to save Antonio, who was a friend and fellow Venetian. BASSANIO. ANTONIO. Are not with me esteem'd above thy life; Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice Do not draw back your hand; I'll take no more; A halter gratis; nothing else, for God's sake! Let his deservings, and my love withal, Mark, Jew, a learned judge! Shakespeare\'s original The Merchant of Venice text is extremely long, so we\'ve split the text into one Scene per page. Get an answer for 'What are your impressions of Shylock in act 4, scene 1 of The Merchant of Venice?' Proceed to judgment. Why, then the devil give him good of it! The throned monarch better than his crown. no haste:— This ring, good sir? ANTONIO. He shall have merely justice, and his bond. What! I stand here for law. This document was downloaded from Lit2Go, a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format published by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology. Upon the place beneath. If you deny it, let the danger light Must needs give sentence ’gainst the merchant there. A pound of that same merchant's flesh is thine. What, wouldst thou have a serpent sting thee twice? To suffer with a quietness of spirit ANTONIO. Give me your hand; come you from old Bellario? DUKE. I am sorry for thee: thou art come to answer A stony adversary, an inhuman wretch uncapable of pity, void and empty 1935 From any dram of mercy. of Rome; his name is Balthazar. SHYLOCK. A pound of that same merchant’s flesh is thine. You may as well forbid the mountain pines Act IV, Scene 1. Shall seize one half his goods; the other half BASSANIO. I have spoke thus much, Which if thou follow, this strict court of Venice. A losing suit against him. Now for your answer: As there is no firm reason to be rend’red, More than a lodg’d hate and a certain loathing. Were in six parts, and every part a ducat. You’ll ask me why I rather choose to have, A weight of carrion flesh than to receive. Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly? And, I beseech you, Make room, and let him stand before our face. Flummoxed, Shylock agrees to take the money he was offered, but now Portia is as inflexible as he was, insisting that he only take a pound of flesh, no more nor less, and without spilling any blood, on pain of being convicted of trying to murder a citizen of Venice. The Duke tells Shylock how he expects the moneylender to relent, but Shylock insists he will have his pound of flesh, predicting the downfall of all that sustains the state if he is refused. Retrieved December 19, 2020, from https://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/41/the-merchant-of-venice/605/merchant-of-venice-act-4-scene-1/. Repair thy wit, good youth, or it will fall. . The party 'gainst the which he doth contrive BASSANIO. They do not deny it, but instead ask Shylock if he has heard about Antonio's losses. I acquainted him with the cause in controversy between the Jew and Antonio the merchant. Most worthy gentleman, I and my friend Upon your charter and your city’s freedom! To hold opinion with Pythagoras Give him the ring, and bring him, if thou canst. I humbly do desire your Grace of pardon; He hath refus'd it in the open court; For half thy wealth, it is Antonio's; My patience to his fury, and am arm'd I will be bound to pay it ten times o'er Merchant of Venice Workbook Answers Act 4, Scene 1 – ICSE Class 10 & 9 English. BASSANIO. GRATIANO. To bring thee to the gallows, not to the font. Share. To know your answer, whether you’ll admit him. I bear Antonio, that I follow thus SCENE 1. Are you acquainted with the difference A Daniel come to judgment! PORTIA. It blesseth him that gives and him that takes. Give me your gloves, I'll wear them for your sake. PORTIA. I have an oath in heaven. If you deny me, fie upon your law! Modern English Reading Act IV Scene I. DUKE : What, is Antonio here? Why he, a wauling bagpipe; but of force It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Which is the merchant here? Shylock tells them that Antonio should "look to his bond" and make sure he repays the money, or else Shylock is planning on taking his pound of flesh. 'Tis very true. Entreat some power to change this currish Jew. Forced to agree, Shylock begs leave to return home, swearing he will sign all the promises there. Ready, so please your grace. SALARINO. It must not be; there is no power in Venice New come from Padua. Thou'lt show thy mercy and remorse, more strange Three thousand ducats. In christening shalt thou have two god-fathers; Dear sir, of force I must attempt you further; He shall have merely justice and his bond. I beseech you let his lack of years be no impediment to let him lack a reverend estimation, for I never knew so young a body with so old a head. Thou shalt have justice more than thou desir’st. Had been her husband, rather than a Christian! The Merchant Of Venice ACT I SCENE I Venice. For thy three thousand ducats here is six. With all my heart. Every offence is not a hate at first. It is an attribute to God himself; Give him the ring, and bring him, if thou canst, Why doth the Jew pause? Give me your hand. Venice. And if your wife be not a mad-woman, Yes, here I tender it for him in the court. What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong? Which is as dear to me as life itself; What, is Antonio here? Than to live still and write mine epitaph. My lord, here stays without Will rush into the state. That have of late so huddled on his back. Shylock gives up his claim, but now Portia tells him that for having attempted to kill a citizen, his goods are forfeited to Antonio and the state, and he himself is under sentence of death. My deeds upon my head! Here, the answer is explained in a crispy and light way using simple points so that you can grasp easily. We trifle time; I pray thee, pursue sentence. Must yield to such inevitable shame (To BASSANIO) More than a lodg'd hate and a certain loathing Meetest for death; the weakest kind of fruit. GRATIANO. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood; But little: I am arm'd and well prepar'd. Entreat some power to change this currish Jew. If this will not suffice, it must appear Do not draw back your hand, I’ll take no more. See Important Quotations Explained. Come here to-day. Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings; I crave the law, Into the trunks of men. The other half comes to the general state, I charge you by the law, You must prepare your bosom for his knife—. Had I been judge, thou shouldst have had ten more, I am sorry for thee; thou art come to answer You may as well do anything most hard A second Daniel, a Daniel, Jew! PORTIA. From stubborn Turks and Tartars, never train'd Be valued 'gainst your wife's commandment. SHYLOCK. Yea, twice the sum. The words expressly are 'a pound of flesh': Merchant of Venice. The danger formerly by me rehears'd. PORTIA. As seek to soften that—than which what's harder?— The Jew shall have my flesh, blood, bones, and all. Say how I lov’d you, speak me fair in death; And when the tale is told, bid her be judge. The dearest ring in Venice will I give you, You taught me first to beg, and now methinks. Have by your wisdom been this day acquitted To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there. Therefore thou must be hang'd at the state's charge. Make no moe offers, use no farther means, Here to this devil, to deliver you. You may as well go stand upon the beach, BASSANIO. Soft! messenger came, in loving visitation was with me a young doctor SHYLOCK. I pray you, let me look upon the bond. Infus'd itself in thee; for thy desires Tarry, Jew. This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood; The words expressly are ‘a pound of flesh.’. DUKE. Chose the Act & Scene from the list below to read The Merchant of Venice translated into modern English. 1 The Merchant of Venice PDF A full version of William Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice text NoSweatShakespeare.com Making Shakespeare easy and accessible . PORTIA. And for your love I’ll take this ring from you. make haste. SHYLOCK. To alter me. Duke. On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart; PORTIA. Should see salvation; we do pray for mercy, A losing suit against him. up your Grace's request in my stead. For giving it to me. I leave him to your gracious acceptance, whose trial shall better publish his commendation.”. Bellario greets your Grace. DUKE OF VENICE. PORTIA. To wag their high tops and to make no noise ANTONIO. History - First War of Independence Trick; English - The Cold Within Learn Trick; Chemistry - Learn periodic table trick; Books; Contact; Wallpaper; QnA; Computer. Are, by the laws of Venice, confiscate An oath, an oath! 'Your Grace shall understand that at the receipt That thou shalt see the difference of our spirit. Into the trunks of men. For herein Fortune shows herself more kind You must prepare your bosom for his knife. You know the law; your exposition Thou wilt not only loose the forfeiture, Tarry a little; there is something else. History - First War of Independence Trick; English - The Cold Within Learn Trick; Chemistry - Learn periodic table trick ; Books; Contact; Wallpaper; QnA; Computer. In Venice, the Court convenes for Antonio’s trial. Not to deny me, and to pardon me. But mercy is above this sceptred sway, Ere thou shalt lose for me one drop of blood. You are welcome; take your place. The pardon that I late pronounced here. William Shakespeare, "Merchant of Venice: Act 4, Scene 1," The Merchant of Venice, Lit2Go Edition, (1597), accessed December 19, 2020, https://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/41/the-merchant-of-venice/605/merchant-of-venice-act-4-scene-1/. Sir, I entreat you home with me to dinner. Therefore I do beseech you. BASSANIO. Please consider making a small donation to help keep this site free. Or less, than a just pound, be it but so much When they are fretten with the gusts of heaven; As seek to soften that—than which what’s harder?—, His Jewish heart! I acquainted him with the cause Questions Answers 1. DUKE. 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes Give me your hand, Bassanio: fare you well.! PORTIA. But with all brief and plain conveniency. It cannot be. PORTIA. But touch’d with humane gentleness and love. Most heartily I do beseech the court View Merchant of Venice.pdf from DRAMA 121 at Queens College, CUNY. Why he, a harmless necessary cat; Hates any man the thing he would not kill? I'll not answer that, ’Tis very true. . And you must cut this flesh from off his breast. To quit the fine for one half of his goods; Have by your wisdom been this day acquitted. Dear sir, of force I must attempt you further. Of what it likes or loathes. You will answer Therefore, Jew. From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flints, From stubborn Turks, and Tartars never train’d. From both, my lord. Though justice be thy plea, consider this, His sceptre shows the force of temporal power, The Duke is talking to Antonio. The Jew shall have my flesh, blood, bones, and all, Read every line of Shakespeare’s original text alongside a modern English translation. Soft, no haste. Were in six parts, and every part a ducat, To have the due and forfeit of my bond. PORTIA. When it is paid according to the tenour. O noble judge! He shall have nothing but the penalty. I'll pay it instantly with all my heart. To let the wretched man outlive his wealth, To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow, An age of poverty; from which ling’ring penance. I am not bound to please thee with my answer. I am not bound to please thee with my answers. English Maths Physics Chemistry Biology. THE MERCHANT OF VENICE (ACT 4 SCENE 1) October 13th, 2020 Response to Questions posed by students during the live Lesson: S.No. When you do take the means whereby I live. That malice bears down truth. Why dost thou whet thy knife so earnestly? To test her husband, she asks only for the ring he is wearing. It doth appear you are a worthy judge; Shed thou no blood; nor cut thou less nor more, SHYLOCK. Than is her custom: it is still her use Of such misery doth she cut me off. The penalty and forfeit of my bond. “Your Grace shall understand that at the receipt of your letter I am very sick, but in the instant that your messenger came, in loving visitation was with me a young doctor of Rome. It is enacted in the laws of Venice, Bassanio is ready to pay Shylock back his money, but Portia rules that it is too late for that. 'Twill be recorded for a precedent, Good sir, this ring was given me by my wife; Come you from old Bellario? SHYLOCK. ANTONIO. Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood Nay, take my life and all, pardon not that: You take my house when you do take the prop, That doth sustain my house; you take my life. The law hath yet another hold on you. ANTONIO. Take then thy bond, take thou thy pound of flesh, One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods. Cannot contain their urine: for affection, Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood. (Antonio; Salerio; Solanio; Bassanio; Lorenzo; Gratiano) Antonio cannot put a finger on exactly why he is so sad; none of his friends’ suggestions quite hit the mark and their attempts to cheer him up are unsuccessful. PORTIA. PORTIA. I stand for judgment: answer; shall I have it? Shylock enters the court and the Duke tells him that all of the men gathered there expect him to pardon Antonio and forgive the debt. Web. Shall I lay perjury upon my soul? This is no answer, thou unfeeling man, Original Text Act IV Scene I. This ring, good sir, alas, it is a trifle! In which predicament, I say, thou stand'st; O learned judge! In christ’ning shalt thou have two god-fathers: Had I been judge, thou shouldst have had ten more. Which is a pound of this poor merchant’s flesh. And where thou now exacts the penalty,— You may as well use question with the wolf, Year Published: 1597 Language: English Country of Origin: England Source: Shakespeare, W. (1597).The Merchant of Venice.New York: Sully and Kleinteich. Take thy forfeiture. I thank thee, Jew, for teaching me that word. Antonio replies that he is prepared to suffer Shylock's rage with quiet dignity. That holds this present question in the court? Go give him courteous conduct to this place. To cureless ruin. That ’scuse serves many men to save their gifts. Why he cannot abide a gaping pig; Ay, 'his breast': As to offend, himself being offended; 'The slaves are ours.' It is so. And many an error by the same example Good cheer, Antonio! The Court Hearing Starts. NERISSA. That holds this present question in the court? I would lose all, ay, sacrifice them all It is so. I am informed throughly of the cause. No, none that thou hast wit enough to make. The pound of flesh which I demand of him And by our holy Sabbath have I sworn Have by some surgeon, Shylock, on your charge. I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it. Meetest for death; the weakest kind of fruit DUKE. Copyright © 2006—2020 by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida. It is not so express'd; but what of that? Two things provided more, that, for this favour, Thou mak’st thy knife keen; but no metal can, No, not the hangman’s axe, bear half the keenness. Merchant Of Venice Act 4 Scene 1 Answers.pdf - search pdf books free download Free eBook and manual for Business, Education,Finance, Inspirational, Novel, Religion, Social, Sports, Science, Technology, Holiday, Medical,Daily new PDF ebooks documents ready for download, All PDF documents are Free,The biggest database for Free books and documents search with fast results better than any … Some three or four of you. You have among you many a purchas'd slave, Repent but you that you shall lose your friend, An answer key is provided. Thyself shalt see the act; Merchant of Venice Act 4, Scene 1. To have it ban'd? Shylock is furious with Antonio, whom he blames for the loss of Jessica, and also bears an older … Shylockenters and complains that both Solanio and Salerio had something to do with his daughter's flight. ANTONIO. This letter from Bellario doth commend GRATIANO. At the court of law in Venice, the Duke, Antonio, Bassanio, Salerio, Graziano, and various notable personages are gathered for Antonio's trial. Merchant of Venice. Are wolfish, bloody, starv'd and ravenous. A street. Summary; Act 1 scene 1; Act 1 scene 2; Act 1 Scene 3; Act 2 Scene 1; Act 2 Scene 2; Act 2 Scene 3; Act 2 Scene 4; Act 2 Scene 5; Act 2 Scene 6; Act 2 Scene 7; More; Treasure Trove; History; More . Of the defendant; and thou hast incurr'd As makes it light or heavy in the substance, Be season'd with such viands? Thy currish spirit. Act 2, Scene 1: Belmont. O wise and upright judge, Here ’tis, most reverend doctor, here it is. The Merchant of Venice is the story of a Jewish moneylender who demands that an antisemitic Christian offer “a pound of flesh” as collateral against a loan.First performed in 1598, Shakespeare’s study of religious difference remains controversial. SHYLOCK. An upright judge, a learned judge! (To ANTONIO.) Mark, Jew. And, when the tale is told, bid her be judge You'll ask me why I rather choose to have PORTIA. SHYLOCK. Take some remembrance of us, as a tribute, SHYLOCK. GRATIANO. “The slaves are ours.” So do I answer you: Is dearly bought as mine, and I will have it. Some men there are love not a gaping pig; Thou but offend'st thy lungs to speak so loud; Take some remembrance of us as a tribute. His name is Balthazar. Not on thy sole, but on thy soul, harsh Jew. Title slide: https://wallpaperaccess.com/venice-night2. I will not shame myself to give you this. To stop his wounds, lest he do bleed to death. A young and learned doctor to our court. —We trifle time. [A]ffection, Mistress of passion, sways it to the mood Of what it likes or loathes. I wish you well, and so I take my leave. I will have nothing else but only this; What dost thou say? Three thousand ducats, due unto the Jew, Read the full text of The Merchant of Venice Act 4 Scene 1 with a side-by-side translation HERE. Whether Bassanio had not once a love. For more information, including classroom activities, readability data, and original sources, please visit https://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/41/the-merchant-of-venice/605/merchant-of-venice-act-4-scene-1/. Drops earliest to the ground, and so let me. I would she were in heaven, so she could BASSANIO. On what compulsion must I? I’ll not answer that; And I be pleas’d to give ten thousand ducats. You take my house when you do take the prop Read a character analysis of Shylock, plot summary and important quotes. Merchant of Venice Act 4, Scene 1 Modern English Translation Meaning Annotations – ICSE Class 10 & 9 English. Commend me to your honourable wife: Be merciful. Beg that thou mayst have leave to hang thyself; Would any of the stock of Barabbas The other, that he do record a gift, To offices of tender courtesy. GRATIANO. Go give him courteous conduct to this place. It is enthroned in the hearts of kings, SHYLOCK. Not on thy sole, but on thy soul, harsh Jew, Marry them to your heirs! O upright judge! Forgive a moiety of the principal, But just a pound of flesh: if thou tak'st more, His Jewish heart: therefore, I do beseech you, The court awards it, and the law doth give it. He does not feel well. And therein do account myself well paid: And pluck commiseration of his state ICSE Solutions Selina ICSE Solutions ML Aggarwal Solutions. Act IV, Scene 1 New Character: The Duke of Venice: highest authority in Venice Download The Merchant of Venice Study Guide. cannot enough commend,—comes with him at my importunity to fill All Acts and Scenes are listed on the The Merchant of Venice text page, or linked to from the bottom of this page. Yet in such rule that the Venetian law Of thy sharp envy. He is furnish’d with my opinion, which better’d with his own learning, the greatness whereof I cannot enough commend, comes with him, at my importunity, to fill up your Grace’s request in my stead. ANTONIO. Thou shalt have nothing but the forfeiture O Jew! BASSANIO. To give the judgment. Why doth the Jew pause? Summary; Act 1 scene 1; Act 1 scene 2; Act 1 Scene 3; Act 2 Scene 1; Act 2 Scene 2; Act 2 Scene 3; Act 2 Scene 4; Act 2 Scene 5; Act 2 Scene 6; Act 2 Scene 7; More; Treasure Trove; History; More. To stop his wounds, lest he do bleed to death. His good friend Bassanio joins him. SHYLOCK. To know your answer, whether you'll admit him. What judgment shall I dread, doing no wrong? Solanio and Salerio discuss the rumor that Antonio has lost yet a second ship. Shylock, there’s thrice thy money off’red thee. Be merciful. Let me have judgment and the Jew his will. The law allows it, and the court awards it. Unto his son Lorenzo and his daughter. My mind was never yet more mercenary. His rigorous course; but since he stands obdurate. Be valued ’gainst your wive’s commandment. Come, Antonio. Of a strange nature is the suit you follow, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven. I beseech you let his lack Which like your asses, and your dogs and mules. If every ducat in six thousand ducats How much more elder art thou than thy looks! I would not draw them, I would have my bond. We turn’d o’er many books together. Only for this, I pray you, pardon me. I take this offer then; pay the bond thrice. GRATIANO. What, man, courage yet! Say how I lov'd you; speak me fair in death; For it appears by manifest proceeding I am sorry that your leisure serves you not. Yea, a Daniel! How much more elder art thou than thy looks! Meantime, the court shall hear Bellario's letter. and find homework help for other The Merchant of Venice questions at eNotes CLERK. 1597. PORTIA. There is no power in the tongue of man You teach me how a beggar should be answer'd. How shalt thou hope for mercy, rend’ring none? On forfeit of my hands, my head, my heart. PORTIA. The Duke has attempted to persuade Shylock to spare Antonio, but Shylock will not. For if the Jew do cut but deep enough, I am sorry that your leisure serves you not. Therefore, Jew, As there is no firm reason to be render'd, And find it out by proclamation: Beg that thou mayst have leave to hang thyself. From brassy bosoms and rough hearts of flint, And yet, thy wealth being forfeit to the state, I leave him Glancing an eye of pity on his losses, He attendeth here hard by, The Duke, Antonio, Bassanio, Gratiano, Salerio, The Magnificoes, and others enter.The Duke begins the proceedings, and offers Antonio his sympathies - Shylock is out for blood. Shylock, the world thinks, and I think so too, He tries to refuse it, as he received it from his wife and swore to her he would not take it off, but in the end he sends Gratiano after the lawyer with the ring. Cannot contain their urine; for affection, O excellent young man! Can no prayers pierce thee? DUKE. The other half comes to the general state. I have possess'd your Grace of what I purpose, These be the Christian husbands! But little; I am arm’d and well prepar’d. To cut the forfeiture from that bankrupt there. The Duke threatens to dismiss the court unless the lawyer Bellario arrives, as Gratiano hurls insults on Shylock to no effect. NERISSA. SHYLOCK. Antonio and Bassanio thank the lawyer, asking permission to pay “him”, but Portia insists she will accept nothing. SHYLOCK. Nay, take my life and all, pardon not that: And stand indebted, over and above, The dearest ring in Venice will I give you, The deeds of mercy. You press me far, and therefore I will yield. How shalt thou hope for mercy, rendering none? I would not draw them; I would have my bond. Therefore thou must be hang’d at the state’s charge. Annotated, searchable text of THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, Act 4, Scene 1, with summaries and line numbers. SHYLOCK. In sooth I … I have a daughter; Whom I have sent for to determine this, . I must away this night toward Padua, Nearest the merchant’s heart. A pound of flesh, to be by him cut off In Venice, the Duke opens Antonio's trial by saying that he pities Antonio because Shylock is an "inhuman wretch uncapable of pity" (4.1.3–4). Shakespeare, William. PORTIA. There is no force in the decrees of Venice. Answer—shall I have it? Not as fee. What mercy can you render him, Antonio? PORTIA. Read the NoSweatShakespeare Modern The Merchant of Venice ebook for free! The Jew shall have all justice. PORTIA. GRATIANO. From any dram of mercy. Therefore prepare thee to cut off the flesh. (Enter the DUKE: the Magnificoes; ANTONIO, BASSANIO, GRATIANO, When they are fretten with the gusts of heaven; I am content, so he will let me have He is well paid that is well satisfied; Fly toward Belmont. There’s more depends on this than on the value. I have possess’d your Grace of what I purpose. SHYLOCK. Unless Bellario, a learned doctor, To the last hour of act; and then, 'tis thought, Though justice be thy plea, consider this, That in the course of justice, none of us. I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it. Passage – 1 (Act IV, Sc.I, Lines 16-34) Paraphrase : DUKE : Make room, and let him stand before us. And others, when the bagpipe sings i' the nose, Of one poor scruple; nay, if the scale do turn Down, therefore, and beg mercy of the duke. Good cheer, Antonio! 'Let them be free, marry them to your heirs? One drop of Christian blood, thy lands and goods To be so taken at thy peril, Jew. Thou hast contrived against the very life Which, fike your asses and your dogs and mules, We freely cope your courteous pains withal. Even from the gallows did his fell soul fleet, SHYLOCK. We all expect a gentle answer, Jew. That indirectly, and directly too, Shakespeare homepage | Merchant of Venice You can buy the Arden text of this play from the Amazon.com online bookstore: The Merchant of Venice (Arden Shakespeare: Second Series) Entire play in one page. Whereof you are a well-deserving pillar, DUKE. That I should neither sell, nor give, nor lose it. Shall I say to you. O wise and upright judge! Give me your gloves, I’ll wear them for your sake. To excuse the current of thy cruelty. No, not for Venice. Yea, a Daniel! in controversy between the Jew and Antonio the merchant; we You, merchant, have you any thing to say? PORTIA. But in the estimation of a hair, Which humbleness may drive unto a fine. That lately stole his daughter: Can alter a decree established; 'Tis well you offer it behind her back; To show off his mercy, the Duke immediately pardons the moneylender his life. Wrest once the law to your authority; Go, Gratiano, run and overtake him; The quality of mercy is not strain'd; Specifically, questions pertain to the following: Discerning what the text says implicitly and explicitly I pray you think you question with the Jew: And bid the main flood bate his usual height; You may as well use question with the wolf.

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